Traditional Tempeh? Don’t Have no Banana Trees in My Backyard…


tempeh banana
Inoculated Tempeh in Banana Leaf

New July, 2014 Follow Up…

This has been a great method, developed by Organic Cultures, for wrapping soy beans inoculated with tempeh spores. The culturing/fermentation times are shorter, which could be in part from the wild yeast spores on the burdock leaf. Burdock wrapping of the tempeh cakes makes it easier and faster to produce vs. filling plastic bags.

The burdock leaf is prefect this time of year for trying this tempeh production method yourself. Hurry though as the burdock will start the flowering and seed production cycles soon, which is still OK for wrapping the soy beans. This method is more like the traditional recipe and replaces plastic bags and the mess of poking all the holes.

Once the cakes are inoculated and growing tempeh spores medium, simply place cakes into a freezer bag and freeze. We find it best to take the finished cakes out right before you plan to use them and allow thawing about half way through. Letting the cake thaw completely seems to make a softer lower grade product.

Let us know in the comments how this method goes for you. Remember to identify correctly the plant used or have someone knowledgeable in herbal medicine assist you.


As with most of North America, we cannot produce tempeh in the traditional manor.  Traditional tempeh is a mix of cooked soybeans inoculated with the proper spore starter.  The inoculated tempe mixture is wrapped in fresh banana leaves to ferment outside for a day or two.

Here in the USA, it is common use plastic bags with perforated with holes for fermenting the soy cakes; however, this is not following traditional ways or sustainable methods.  The following experiment, brought about by looking for an alternative, is as follows: …

Experiment #:  Tempe1012AB274 –
Alternative Sources for Tempeh Fermentation

Equipment Used: Dehulled split soybeans, tempeh spores, burdock leaves, common kitchen and lab utensils and glassware.

– Experiment started via the standard tempeh recipe found on our website.  Once soy beans are cooked and processed, the steps changed from placing tempeh mixture in perforated plastic bags to encasing the spore inoculated soy beans in a sustainable and eco-friendly wrapping.

burdock leaf  –  Cakes then wrapped in fresh burdock leaf.  Found single layer of leaf material breaks and needs more holding strength.  Some blanch the burdock leaves; in this case, we did not.  Used two to three leaves placed opposed to each other.  Proper amount of tempe spore soybean mixture placed within leaf ‘basket’.  Secure with toothpicks or bamboo.  Amount of mixture can very due to size of leaves, however, for better fermentation times use around
a 1/3 cup or 4 oz/ 113gr per leaf.

– Fermented cakes for 29 hours at 75 degrees F on breathable rack lightly covered with layer of plastic film to keep moisture in.  Cakes need air circulation but not enough to dry out.  Cover with additional layers of burdock leaves for future testing.

– Extra mixture placed in glass baking tray vs. plastic bags, mixture pressed down to better inoculate soybeans and covered lightly with plastic wrap.  Within same time frame as above, soybeans showed complete growth with pure white ‘fuzzy’ growth on top of the soy beans.  This method seemed faster for quick use or where a sliced ‘cake’ packaged in plastic bags, is not desired.  Allows easier mixing of a sauce or marinade with the fermented tempeh.  In our test, we mixed the tempeh with BBQ sauce, pressed into cakes, battered and deep fried.  Not the healthiest tempeh recipe it is a great vegan substitution for meat!
With a cultured dipping sauce, it makes a very nice appetizer or snack.

tempeh spore cake
Buy Tempeh Spore StarterRagi Tempe Spore Starter


Kombucha Tips for the Week 10-26-2013

Using Herbal Teas, Flavored Teas and or Wild-Crafted Plants – A Quick Word

Traditionally, brewing and maintaining kombucha mushroom culture required black tea and a sugar source.  There are reasons for using black tea that aid in the longevity of the cultures vitality by working as a nutrient solution.
When using herbal teas or plants to brew kombucha tea mushroom cultures the concern lays is the amount of volatile oils contained within the plant in question.  Using herbs, plants, or flavored traditional teas with high amounts of volatile oils may affect the growth of the Kombucha culture.  An example of a tea not to use would be peppermint tea.  Also, avoid herbal or flavored teas that contain high amount of bitters.  The benefits of using medicinal herbs when preparing kombucha tea can greatly enhance the beneficial properties of the kombucha tea tonic.

A great old time Kombucha recipe, from Russia, is an alternative to traditional black tea is dried rose hips, dried elderberries, and a sugar source.  This is a very old traditional recipe as both ingredients could be gathered in most areas with very low cost, if any, compared to imported tea, which only the wealthy could afford.

Teas NOT recommended for brewing kombucha tea, include but are not limited to: Sage, peppermint, St. John’s Wort, chamomile flower, ginger root, or plants
within the pepper family

Herbs Safe to Use for Brewing:
Aniseed, young blackberry or raspberry leaf and berry, chicory root, club moss, dandelion, elder flowers and berries, fennel, hibiscus flower, nettle leaf, oat straw.  In addition, Rooibos tea (red bush tea), plantain leaf, rose hips common, yerba maté leaf, and valerian root.

NOTES on Fresh Plant/Herbs:  First, use low oil teas, Google herbal sites for complete listing.  One draw back to using herbal tea is that they contain more wild yeast spores over green or black tea.  This may contaminate the kombucha cultures; on the other hand, the wild yeast may assist in producing a fizzier beverage.  This happens by introducing more yeast into the brewing vessel.  The draw back is that you have no control over what type of yeast you introduce.  In short, there may be a higher chance of contaminating your kombucha mushroom cultures by using herbal teas or plants.  Use a backup culture for experiments!  To prevent contamination, make sure your pH readings are within the proper range.

Kombucha Tip For the Week 10/16/2013

kombucha tea cultureKombucha Tip For the Week… As requested again… Kombucha Tea Fast Brew Method V02:
Our fast brew method can save a bit of time and the tea/sugar solution is ready to inoculate with the kombucha cultures and start tea.
KT Classic Recipe… is as follows: – 1 gallon water, bring to boil – Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon – Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir – Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture – Brew 7 to 14 days
KT Fast Brew Method: – ½ gallon of water, bring to boil – Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon – Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir to dissolve – Add ½ gallon of cold water, mix – Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture – Brew 7 to 14 days   The difference is that the fast brew method will require less time to cool the raw tea/sugar solution, thus, getting the round brewing faster. The basic difference is cutting the water in your recipe by half and then adding the other half of the water (cold) at the very end. This cools the solution faster, to get the batch started and help to prevent mold.
Happy Brewing, Nirinjan Singh

Kefir Grains – Live vs. Dried – Which Kefir is the Best Buy For You ?

Kefir Grains – Live vs. Dried – Which One is the Best Buy For You ?

  Today someone searching to buy kefir grains on the web will find many sites selling ‘living’ kefir or dried/dehydrated kefir grains.  For someone new to food culturing there are many questions…, What is the best source to buy kefir?  What type of grains do I need?  Where to get the best grains?

There are two types of kefir that one can buy, Milk kefir grains, which are a naturally occurring organism originating in the Caucasus or water kefir grains from Meso-America.  Of the two, the live fresh active grains are the best buy for your money and time.  However, both types offer benefits unique each to itself.

The fresh kefir grains re-balance quickly and begin producing drinkable pro-biotic kefir within just a few days of arriving after shipment.  This is an excellent option if you live within the USA and are able to attend to them immediately.
If you are either
a) not located within the U.S. or
b) not able to attend to the fresh grains immediately upon arrival, then dried kefir grains are the best option for you.
These will take longer to activate – about a week or so to ‘wake up’ and adjust the balance to where they are producing a drinkable kefir beverage.  This is a great option if the grains will be in transit internationally, since they are in a dormant stage and will not degrade or less likely to be damaged over the fresh grains.  This also gives you the option to stick the dried grains in your cupboard or refrigerator if you receive them, but, are not ready to use them (or want to hang onto them as a backup source or a gift to give). Water kefir grains are known to sometimes be difficult to revive from a dried state (or just takes a long time) in some cases.  Usually it’s hard to put the blame on any one thing, they just tend to be more fragile and pickier than milk kefir grains.

Below are a list of companies and websites that sell different kefir grain starters.  Below is information from the company’s website pages on kefir:

purchase live fresh kefir grains over dried or dehydrated


From their website…“These kefir grains are real grains maintained on organic milk.  Unlike the pre-packaged kefir starters, such as Cultures for Health, Helios, or Body Ecology, that you may find on other sites or selling in retail stores, these are the real living grains of the kefir culture.  Our kefir grains are ready for use out of the packet, no failed productions or waiting several rounds for the kefir grains (milk or water types) to become ‘active’ again.  You will not find our strains of kefir grains in any store!  These grains will last a lifetime with proper care.  Our Kefir Cultures are Always Live & Fresh…Never Dried & Dehydrated.”

Benefits:   Five different kefir types to choose from, plus many other food cultures.  Fresh, active culture starters, organic grown, kefir is ready to use from the package and a first batch of kefir is ready within 24 to 48 hours.  A 100% replacement guarantee, if the cultures are not viable.
Drawbacks:  Not able to ship to international destinations (but for Canada) due to fresh raw nature of culture starters.


bodyE_kefir_2Body Ecology

From their website…”Contains 6 packets that can be used an average of 7 times each.  Six tablespoons of previous batch will ferment 1 quart of liquid.”

Benefits:   Convenience and great for short time usage,
Drawbacks:   Isolated lab grown cultures, repurchase required, limited usage.  Invest in real kefir grains for long term usage.


dried_kefir_starter_01 Yogourmet

From their website…”Yogourmet kefir starter is prepared from selected strains of dairy cultures and yeast as well as kefir grains, so that each batch you make produces excellent quality kefir.  Yogourmet kefir starter does not require the use of a yogurt maker, since the milk is incubated at room temperature for about 24 hours.  Each box contains 3 envelopes of 2 X 5 grams and each envelope makes 2 liters of kefir”.

  Convenience and great for short time usage,
Drawbacks:  Isolated lab grown cultures, repurchase required, limited usage.  Invest in real kefir grains for long term use.

Helios_kefir_01Lifeway Helios Kefir & Other Ready to Drink Kefirs

From their website…”Putting a bottle of Lifeway Kefir in your hand just makes so much sense.  It allows you to be proactive about your health, filling your digestive system with friendly bacteria.  Lifeway Kefir is also loaded with nutritious ingredients.”
Benefits:  Convenience in a ready to go drink and great for short time usage or when traveling,
Drawbacks:  High price, isolated lab grown cultures, extra packaging, and limited pro-biotic content.


dried_kefir_grains_01Cultures For Health

From their website…”Our milk kefir grains are shipped in a dehydrated state in a barrier-sealed packet.  Upon receipt, the dairy grains can be rehydrated in fresh milk (this process usually takes 5 to 7 days) and then used to make kefir by adding the grains to fresh milk, stirring, covering, and leaving at room temperature until the desired consistency is reached.”
Benefits:  Cultures are cheap to buy, due to mass production.  Great for shipping to countries outside the USA.
 No moneyback or return policy.  Small packet of lab produced and dried starter culture, leaving little room for error. Must rehydrate the grains before use, wasting milk and time.  Dehydrated grains may not reactivat depending on the shelflife.

Each type of starter has it’s own benefits depending on what and how the cultures are to be shipped or transported.  This is a final note on food cultures…”Buying or obtaining the freshest kefir or other starter cultures, one can, will assist in producing the best cultured and viable product.  I suggest fresh culture over dried/dehydrated if possible.”, Nirinjan Singh, Director –

Kombucha Tea Question of the Week…

Kombucha tea in Grolsch
Kombucha tea in Grolsch style beer bottles for safety

“Hi, I’m new to making Kombucha and I have a concern about bottling KT after the second ferment.  I have read on many sites that there’s a chance the bottle can explode from carbonation buildup and that …I should be very careful. So how do I be very careful?  Moreover, is that really a concern?  I see on your site that you do not mention it when explaining how to bottle KT.  Is that only a concern after the second ferment?”

To Answer Your Question…
Bottling is the best way to extend the shelf life of the kombucha beverage.  There is a concern with excessive buildup of carbonation when bottling.  Below are some steps to follow when doing the secondary fermentation:
1.  Do NOT add extra sugar or juice when bottling.  This adds raw sugar source which the yeasts will turn into carbonation & alcohol)
2.  Use quality bottles such as Grolsch style beer bottle (Grolsch or standard beer bottles are designed to hold extra pressure)
3.  Leave a 5% head space when filling each bottle and the pH is below 4.5
(In the beverage industry, this amount is required by the FDA)
4.  Just to make sure all is safe, keep your bottles in a cardboard or plastic box to keep glass and liquid from going every where    Following these easy steps will assist you in your secondary bottling process.  Please comment below with any other questions or a tip you may have to share.

Happy Brewing!

Kombucha Tip For the Week… & Culture Question of the Week…

Kombucha Tea Tip for the Week…

Kombucha tea fast brew method… Our fast brew method can save a bit of time and the tea/sugar solution is ready to inoculate with the kombucha cultures and start tea.

KT classic recipe is as follows:
– 1 gallon water, bring to boil

– Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon

– Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir to dissolve

– Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture

– Brew 7 to 14 days

Kombucha Tea Culture Fast Brew Method:
– ½ gallon of water, bring to boil

– Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon

– Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir to dissolve

– Add ½ gallon of cold water, mix

– Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture

– Brew 7 to 14 days

The difference is that the fast brew method will require less time to cool the raw solution, thus, getting the round brewing faster.  The basic difference is cutting the water in your recipe by half and then adding the other half of the water (cold) at the very end.

Question of the Week…

My Kombucha Culture is Producing a Flat Beverage, What Can I do to Make More Fizz?

This happens to many KT brewers from time to time. First of all, use best quality ingredients you can afford, we suggest organic ingredients. Are you using city water? Then stop!  Try changing the type of tea your using and use no teas high in oil content, like peppermint or Earl Grey.
Some people will tell you to just add more sugar, however, just as in beer and saké making, adding to much sugar can make the yeast even more sluggish.
I believe temperature plays a bigger role in producing fizz in the KT, which is the carbon dioxide (CO2), produced from the yeast breaking down the sugars.  My suggestion is to make sure the temp (of the liquid, not the ambient temp) is at least 80 deg F for the first 3 or 4 days, then drop the temp down to 70-75 Deg F for the rest of the brewing cycle.  If you feel that you need more sugar then add it by ‘addition’ over the first 3 days of brewing.
Another trick is to make sure the raw tea/sugar solution is aerated. Do this by pouring the cooled tea between two vessels several times. One last tip, the SCOBY culture helps to trap in the CO2 so make sure your culture doesn’t have a lot of holes in it and that the new culture forms and seals the top of the liquid.

Hope this helps, Happy Brewin’, Nirinjan Singh

Kombucha Mushroom – Preventing Mold and Contamination

  By following a few simple measures one can keep the culture strong and contamination free. There are many types of unwanted air-born or surface contaminations; however, by keeping the cultures covered as much as possible we can greatly reduce the amount of wild yeasts and unwanted molds.  By reducing the amount of foreign and unwanted invaders,
the kombucha strains stay strong, healthy, and viable.

Through either neglect, improper environmental conditions, or the wrong nutrients the mushroom culture can become weak and susceptible to contamination.  By following the steps below, your kombucha
culture should last a lifetime and more

Kombucha & Mold

Steps For Preventing Mold and Contamination on Kombucha Mushroom
and Tips For Keeping Your Culture Starter Happy & Healthy !  

1. KEEP CULTURES COVERED AT ALL TIMES    Keep the culture jars or brewing containers covered with a clean section of cloth or breathable material and secured tightly with rubber bands or string. .

2. NO SMOKING    Do NOT smoke cigarettes and tobacco around the kombucha fermenting area or even better not to smoke in the same house.  Smoke molecules may kill or weaken the cultures.  The constitutes within the tobacco smoke are not to the kombucha bacteria and yeast and will be directly affected by this action.

3. USE QUALITY INGREDIENTS    Though at first this may not seem to be a step in preventing mold contamination,
however, by feeding your culture (and yourself) the highest quality
ingredients you provide the best range of nutrients
and less chemicals and preservatives.

KT Brewin

4. SELECTING A PROPER BREWING SPACE    Selecting a proper area for the kombucha tea to sit and brew can make all the difference in the world between a healthy culture and a weak one.  The kombucha mushroom requires a nice warm place, out of direct sunlight, to ferment the tea solution.  The closer to 80 deg F the better the cultures will grow.  The faster the cultures can grow out within the tea/sugar solution the less chance of contamination by mold.  Keep the kombucha out of the kitchen area.  Although this is the most convenient place for most people to store and brew, it is also the worst!  Smoke from cooking, burning fats, and other particles are again not to the liking of the mushroom culture.  Out of all areas in your house, including the bathroom, the kitchen area has the most wild yeast, molds, and germs.  Not only do dirty surfaces, sink drains, and leftover food particles in the kitchen provide a breeding ground for unwanted molds and bacteria.  The kitchen area also provides other abundant sources of molds and wild yeast
through the washing and prepping of fruits and vegetables.  Do not worry though, if kept at the p
roper pH, the acidic nature of the kombucha culture mushroom will protect its self from contamination.

5. KEEPING PROPER TEMPERATURE    This may not seem to have much to do with contamination, but, by maintaining the proper temperature range of 75 to 85 degrees F the kombucha will ferment the tea solution much faster.  The faster the kombucha yeast and bacteria strains can culture out the tea solution the less chance of contamination by invaders.
Finding the correct place within your home can make a big difference on the temperature of the brewing tea.

‘pH test strips

6. CORRECT pH    This, by far, is the most important factor and the key to keeping your kombucha  and other traditional food cultures healthy and viable!  Why?  Because if the pH of any solution ormixture is below 4.5 pH, on the pH scale, it is almost impossible for micro-bacteria to grow.  By keeping the pH low, the likely hood of mold ever growing on the surface of your SCOBY is very unlikely.  This is also the easiest tip to follow.  We keep the pH of kombucha low by adding what is called ‘starter tea’ to every new batch of tea.  Keep the pH of the culture below 4.5, as most molds can only grow in a higher pH solution.  Do this by using a good amount (about 10%) of fermented ‘starter tea  from your last batch to lower the pH of the new batch of fresh tea/sugar solution.  Testing a new batch of tea, using pH test strips with a narrow range of 0-6 pH, will tell you the acid content of the tea.  It is recommended to keep adding starter tea until the pH is lowered to the correct range.  However, do not lower the pH factor to much or the Kombucha culture cannot complete the brewing cycle properly.  Purchase pH test strips here. 

7. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS AND LAST TIPS    Keep the cultures away from plants, as the soil contains millions of spores and microbes in the soil, keep plants in a different room if possible.  Do not neglect your culture!  Allowing the top of the kombucha SCOBY to dry out is the number one cause of contamination.  Lastly, use common sense and good hygiene when brewing your own tea.  Clean any glassware and utensils before each use and wash hands before handling the cultures.  DO NOT use anti-bacterial soaps.  Remember, properly fermented tea always has a slight vinegar smell not a musty or moldy smell.
Of course, if there is mold on the kombucha culture then discard the tea cultures and never try to ‘save’ a culture once it has
been overgrown with something unknown that could be dangerous to your health or life.

By Following a Few Simple Tips Your Kombucha Will be Happy & Mold Free!

What does a Growing Kombucha Mushroom Cycle Look Like?

  Having not brewed kombucha tea before, many people ask us what the kombucha mushroom looks like as it is brewing, with many of the questions pertaining to misidentification of mold.  In the photos below are signs to look for to know if the kombucha is viable and growing correctly.
The following photos, we hope, will assist you in brewing your first batch of this wonderful pro-biotic cultured health tonic.  The cultures used in the photos are grown with organic sugar and tea, and are kept at an average of 80 degrees F.  Correct temperature plays one of the biggest role in successful Kombu Cha brewing!  Below are step-by-step photos:

Kombucha at 2-3 Days
Click on any photo to enlargekombucha_growth_01-252x162
When cultured at 80 deg F, we    see signs of growth on the second to third day.  Signs of a thin translucent film or jelly-like layer appear on top of the tea solution.  An important reason not to disturb the growing mushroom cultures.

Kombucha at 3-5 Days
Click on any photo to enlargekombucha tea brewing 4 day
By the end of the third day and
the next few days the kombucha mushroom will start to thicken and turn from translucent to a cream coloured mass.  Notice in the photo how parts of the culture are thicker in spots than in others.
Kombucha Tea at 5-8 Days
Click on any photo to enlargebrew kombucha at 7 days
As the brewing cycle passes      the half way point, the mushroom culture continues to thicken.
Notice the carbonic acid bubbles forming under the      culture or S.C.O.B.Y. – symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast
 Kombucha Tea at 7 to 14 Days
Click on any photo to enlargeKT tea culture
The kombucha tea brewing       cycle is completed. The culture has formed completely and the tea is now ready to test for drinking and bottling.  Low temperature may increase brewing time
The pH should read
very close to 3.0 pH
Close-up of Gases Build Up
Click on any photo to enlargekombucha showing CO2
Here is a close-up of gases and CO2 production. This is a good sign early on that conditions are prime for the kombucha. With just a few days growth we have a nice layer forming and the gases indicate that the yeast and actively converting sugars.
Mushroom Brewing Complete
Click on any photo to enlargekombucha SCOBY
A side view of the kombucha culture growing in a gallon size container. The mushroom is         1/4 inch thick and is very nice cream colour. This tea brewed at a slower yeast conversion rate meaning less bubbles and a more uniform mushroom. Notice the writing on the side, always date each batch of tea.

  A kombucha brewing cycle on average takes from 7 to 14 days, however, it can take up to 30 days if the temperature is low.  In the colder months, a external heating source may be needed to keep the proper temperature.  IN the colder months keeping the pH balance correct will help prevent mold growth.  For more information on home food culturing, recipes, and finding the starter cultures you need visit our main site or store Next week we’ll be talking about kombucha mushroom and pH balance.  Happy Culturing!

Welcome to Organic-Cultures

Culture Food stored and ready to eat

We are excited to introduce our newest web site dedicated to nothing but food culturer starters. We still provide the best kombucha cultures and fresh live kefir grain but now we have many other food cultures such as koji and tempeh spores.  At Organic Cultures.Com, we provide fresh traditional raw food cultures, including kefir grains, from different regional sources from around the world. All cultures are maintained with certified organic ingredients.   From dairy kefir and 5 different water kefir grains, kombucha tea starter, tempeh spores, and amasaké koji, we provide many cultures for the home food culturist.  Bringing these traditional foods cultures back into your life nourishes you and your family with healthy pro-biotics, real living foods, and a bit of ‘culture’, too!

This Blog will give the latest information on cultured foods, news articles, and thoughts on again creating living food just as we did from the start of civilization.


Why consume Probiotics like Kefir and Kombucha?

Probiotics are microflora that live all around us.  Common types of microflora are bacteria, yeast and molds.  Some of these like, dairy kefir and water kefir grains, are beneficial to the human body we call these probiotics.  These probiotic microscopic organisms (microflora) help the body build long-lasting immunity to a host of illnesses and diseases, including allergies, irritable bowels, viruses, bacterial infections, and yes, cancer!  No vaccination or prescription medicine in the world could ever come close to this safe and beneficial way of balancing the body’s billions of microbes. Probiotics not only help create this balance but also helps maintain it for years and years, hence the name probiotic, which means “for life.”

This all natural way of supplementing your defense system is vital in today’s frightening, non-nutritional jungle of toxic food and medicine.  Many people, especially in the United States, are surrounded by bad influences, through our food, environment, and lifestyle.

Probiotic Cultures, Like Kefir Grains Helps Prevent Damage Before it Occurs…

Probiotic cultures not only prevent damage from being done to our cells, they strengthen our immune system and beat down cancer cells before they ever have a chance of multiplying.  Probiotics weaken mutagenic activity, so your good cells keep winning the battles, and most importantly, the DNA war.  Adding probiotic to your body isn’t hard, just eat!  Culturing your own or buying ‘living’ raw foods is the best and cheapest way to get probiotic into your body.

The majorities of microbes in the intestine are not harmful, but rather play an important role in normal growth and development, but when the pH balance is off , especially in the intestines, major problems begin doing “structural” damage to our system, and reinforcement is often needed, above and beyond a healthy diet.  Also, probiotics can be used to counter the over-consumption of antibiotics so typical in the average American diet, which is often chocked full of non-organic meats and dairy products that come from animals shot up with varying forms of antibiotics.  Antibiotics and trace chemicals are also prominent in municipal drinking water, because it’s “too expensive” for cities to filter them out.

Eliminate Fear and Learn about
Your Inner Ecosystem

Just as Earth and Mother Nature have a delicate balance which needs to be maintained, our bodies have their own “inner ecosystem,” which is like having a rainforest in your digestive track. When your ecosystem is balanced, your intestines are teeming with beneficial bacteria and micro flora to keep your immune system strong.

However, in the USA, we are told that bacteria and yeast means sickness or disease and are marketed anti-bacterial products for cleaning and washing the hands.  The fact is just the opposite in that we would die without a healthy intestinal flora.

Consuming traditional probiotics, like yogurt, ones native to the human digestive tract encourages the production of antibodies, which in turn protects the system from allergies, infections (viral, fungal and bacterial), IBS, and sometimes cancer. In fact, probiotics build defense against disease by enabling your body to build a natural defense, unlike vaccinations. Vaccines are now often crossbred viruses, bacterial strands, mixed up with aluminum and formaldehyde, which shock the system into a panic type of reaction, which is a form of “wild guess” methodology for establishing only short term immunity at best.

Populating your “gut” with beneficial micro flora may help to improve your skin, maintain a healthy weight, and provide energy and overall well-being. Many people who have never heard of probiotics or don’t understand their function may be “turned off” to the concept if educated improperly at first.

Benefits of a Healthy Gut

The second someone reads a typical probiotic label or description reading something like, “Over 6 billion bacteria in each tablet,” it seems overwhelming, and some consumers might set the product back on the shelf, but at that point, they are selling themselves short of a healthy gut.

Start incorporating healthy beneficial bacteria and yeast into you diet and see the difference.  We have many traditional food starter cultures to choose from.  We have many dairy type cultures including kefir grains and vegan cultures, too!  Not into milk based food, try our water grains or make your own ginger brew.  You can see more about each culture type on our main web site or go to our secure store and order at anytime.

Happy Culturing,
Nirinjan Singh, Director