Tag Archives: traditional

Stuffed Cucumber Kimchi – Recipe #3 Oi Sobagi (Traditional)

Kim-chi Oi Sobagi
Oi Sobagi – Stuffed Cucumber Kimchi
(Traditional)
Fermented – Raw – Vegan

  This is a nice and easy to make quick kimchi. Classic for the summertime and are served stuffed to compliment a main dish; they are not quite a condiment and not quite a snack.
The contrasting colours make it great to brighten any dish – the vibrant green of the cucumbers and the red of the chili peppers. This is a great kim-chi for children to try for the first time if not use to foods like kim-chi!
Ingredients Needed:

Brine…

– 2 pounds of cucumbers, unpeeled but with the ends trimmed English cucumbers
– 2 tbsp of sea salt
Filling…
– ¼ cup Korean chili pepper flakes (adjust to your liking)
– 6 ounces Korean chives, finely chopped or 8 green onions, green and white parts, finely chopped.
– ½ cup shredded carrots, optional
– 1 tsp sugar

Directions:

Cut the cucumbers in half width-wise and make a deep X shaped incision extending 2/3’s of the way down the inside of each cucumber.

  Place the cucumbers in a sieve set over a bowl, sprinkle the inside with the salt and allow to set for 30 minutes to drain. Stuff the chili flakes mixture into the cucumbers.  Make sure to place the mixture into all the crevices.  Do two passes: the first focusing on the horizontal segments and the second on the vertical.

kim-chi oi sobagi
Quick Cucumber Kim-chi

Place the cucumbers in a 2 quart-size containers and spoon the remaining filling on top.  Pour the reserved brine liquid into the containers, cover, and set aside at room temperature for 1 or 2 days.  After recommended time, taste the crunchiness and balance of flavors. It should be salty, sweet, and savory.
Serve the cucumbers when the crunchiness that you like. Keep any leftovers in the fridge. This is a quick ferment and keeps about 3 to 7 days. You can keep the reserve kimchi pickle juice to serve over rice noodles or use as a cold soup.

Enjoy!

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Kim Chi Recipe #1 – Mother In-law’s Kim Chi – Baechu Gutjori (Traditional)

kim chiMother In-law’s Kim-Chi Baechu Gutjori (Traditional)

Koreans celebrate the first fall Napa cabbage harvest with this style of Kim-chi.  It may be eaten right away or aged for a time. This style is enriched with both the land and sea with a base of beef stock and sea foods of oysters, salted shrimp, and anchovy sauce.
Ingredients Needed:
Brine…
– To medium heads of fresh Napa cabbage, about 4 to 5 pounds
– 2 tablespoons of sea salt
Sweet Rice Porridge…
To make the porridge add 1/3 cup powered sweet rice to enough water to form a thick paste.  Simmer this ‘porridge’ over heat to remove the raw flour taste.  Allow to cool before adding to the seasoning paste.
Seasoning Paste…
– 2 tbsp of salted shrimp
– 1/3 cup of sweet rice porridge
– ¼ cup anchovy sauce
– ¼ cup beef or vegetable stock
– 2 tbsp minced garlic
– 1 tbsp peeled and grated fresh ginger root
– 2 tsp sugar
– 2/3 cup Korean chili pepper flakes
– ½ cup thinly sliced yellow onion
– 4 green onions, green parts, about ½ cup
– 3 oz of chives
– 6 to 8 fresh oysters (optional)kim-chiDirections:

– Cut cabbage into quarters and then cut ¼ in half lengthwise. Remove cores. End by cutting pieces into 1 inches wide strips and 6 inches long.
– In a large bowl toss cabbage with the salt. Sit aside and allow to brine for at least an hour. Rinse off the salt by running under cold water and allow the cabbage to drain thoroughly.
– To make the seasoning paste… Grind the shrimp and mix in a bowl with the porridge, anchovy paste, stock, garlic, ginger, and sugar. Lastly add the ¼ cup of the chili pepper flakes. Blend well.
– In a large bowl, toss the cabbage, onion, green onions, and chives with the remaining chili flakes. Insure that all the cabbage is coated with the chilies. Add the seasoning paste and oysters and mix well.
– Pack tightly into a 2 quart container, cover, and set aside for 2 to 3 days at room temperature.
Then move to the refrigerator to slow/stop the fermentation. Since the ferment will expand make sure to allow at least a 5% head space to prevent overflow.This style of kim-chi may be eaten directly, allowed to ferment for a short time, or allowed to ferment for a longer amount of times. Enjoy and happy fermenting!

See our web store for many new products, culturing supplies, koji spores, and more:

Kombucha Tip For the Week… & Culture Question of the Week…

Kombucha Tea Tip for the Week…

Kombucha tea fast brew method… Our fast brew method can save a bit of time and the tea/sugar solution is ready to inoculate with the kombucha cultures and start tea.

KT classic recipe is as follows:
– 1 gallon water, bring to boil

– Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon

– Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir to dissolve

– Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture

– Brew 7 to 14 days

Kombucha Tea Culture Fast Brew Method:
– ½ gallon of water, bring to boil

– Add 6 teabags or teaspoons per gallon

– Add 1 to 1½ cups of sugar, stir to dissolve

– Add ½ gallon of cold water, mix

– Allow to cool to room temperature and inoculate with culture

– Brew 7 to 14 days

The difference is that the fast brew method will require less time to cool the raw solution, thus, getting the round brewing faster.  The basic difference is cutting the water in your recipe by half and then adding the other half of the water (cold) at the very end.

Question of the Week…

My Kombucha Culture is Producing a Flat Beverage, What Can I do to Make More Fizz?

This happens to many KT brewers from time to time. First of all, use best quality ingredients you can afford, we suggest organic ingredients. Are you using city water? Then stop!  Try changing the type of tea your using and use no teas high in oil content, like peppermint or Earl Grey.
Some people will tell you to just add more sugar, however, just as in beer and saké making, adding to much sugar can make the yeast even more sluggish.
I believe temperature plays a bigger role in producing fizz in the KT, which is the carbon dioxide (CO2), produced from the yeast breaking down the sugars.  My suggestion is to make sure the temp (of the liquid, not the ambient temp) is at least 80 deg F for the first 3 or 4 days, then drop the temp down to 70-75 Deg F for the rest of the brewing cycle.  If you feel that you need more sugar then add it by ‘addition’ over the first 3 days of brewing.
Another trick is to make sure the raw tea/sugar solution is aerated. Do this by pouring the cooled tea between two vessels several times. One last tip, the SCOBY culture helps to trap in the CO2 so make sure your culture doesn’t have a lot of holes in it and that the new culture forms and seals the top of the liquid.

Hope this helps, Happy Brewin’, Nirinjan Singh