Tag Archives: wild fermentation

Traditional Lactose-Fermented Beverages…

Looking for something different to drink this summer…try our some traditional fermented beverages…Enjoy!

Traditional Lactose-Fermented Beverages…

Bouza (Egypt): An opaque drink made of wheat, water, and sourdough yeast starter..
Gv-No-He-Nv (Cherokee, Native American): A thick, milky drink with the sweet flavors of corn accented by a mild sourness.
T’ej (Ethiopian): A simple honey type wine/mead.
Braga (Middle Europe): A fermented gruel or sour porridge.
Chicha (South America): A clear, bubbly beverage made with corn. Balls of cooked corn mush are chewed and inoculated with saliva, then added to water and allowed to ferment. The taste is similar to kombucha.
Kiesel (Russia and Poland): An important grain-based lacto-fermented drink.
Kvass (Russia and Ukraine): A lacto-fermented drink usually made from stale rye bread. Another version is made with beets.
Mead (Europe): Made from honey, water, and wild yeast. Some methods produced a lacto-fermented drink, very low in alcohol or bottled and aged for more alcohol content.
Munkoyo (Africa): A low alcohol lacto-fermented brew made from millet or sorghum. Also called sorghum beer, consumed in large quantities by field workers and at celebrations. Given to babies to protect them against infection and diarrhea. The missionaries to Africa discouraged its use because it contains alcohol in very small amounts.
Tesguino (Mexico): A low-alcohol beer made with sprouted corn.
Chicha (Andean, Peru): Chewed corn beer having a light, delicious corn flavor.
Pulque (Mexico): A lacto-fermented drink made from the juice of the agavé cactus. With time, it goes alcoholic.
Palm Wine (Africa): The lacto-fermented sap of the palm tree, consumed in tropical areas of Africa and Asia.
Rice Beers (Asia and India): These were traditionally very low in alcohol, and mostly lactose-fermented. In Japan, koji rice mold is used for making sake, amasaké, and simple grog’s.


 

 

Three Wild-crafted Fermented & Pickled Foods

~ Dandelion Leek Miso ~

dandelion leeks
Ran across this and thought I would share…
This recipe idea is great for areas with wild leeks and other wild crafted plants

What is Needed…

– Tub of unpasteurized Red miso or Mugi miso, organic or make your own, which can take 6 months to a year in most cases.
Hint: You can do a mix a sweet miso & hearty miso, too!  The amount of miso used will determine the amount of the other ingredients.
– Fresh Spring Wild Leeks (Allium tricoccum, some know them as Ramps).  The leeks can have a strong taste if harvested at the right time, so adjust accordingly.  About a 1/8th of the volume of miso, you want the flavor, but, not to overpower the miso.
– Dandelion Greens.  Young leaves are best as they are not as bitter as older leaf.  Harvest before flowering.  Same amount/ratio as the leeks.  Some stores sell the greens, too
– Fresh or Dried Stinging Nettles (Uritica dioica).  Here in Michigan you should be able to harvest at the same time as the leeks.  I have a spot that has both growing together!
– Optional Sea Veggies.  Like kombu or wakamé seaweed.

Directions…

Since wild ingredients can very in taste and flavour during the season, I suggest mixing up a small tester batch and adjust ingredients as needed and to your liking.

Since the miso is already made, click here on how to make your own misos , we will start with the other ingredients.

Once you have collected or purchased all the items needed you ready to go!
– Start by cleaning the Leeks: Removing the leaves and roots, leaving the clean bulbs
– Dandelion greens: Remove the centre steam keeping the green part of the leaf,
– Nettle leaf:  Cut off any steams.   Hint: you can remove the ‘stinging’ aspect by blanching or steaming the leaf for a few seconds
– Soak the sea vegetables if dried.

Now cut all ingredients into small pieces and mix together.
Add greens and sea veggies to the miso paste.
Taste and adjust.  Add salt if needed, however, the miso will have a lot of salt already.
The miso blend will ferment the other items and flavour will improve over time.  Suggest allowing the miso mix to set in the refrigerator for 3 to 6 months, if you can wait that long.

~ Fermented Garlic Scapes ~

garlic scape
Here is another quick recipe for use of all the garlic scapes, if you grow garlic you will know what I mean!
Use fermented garlic scapes in any recipe to add a delicious mild garlic flavour!  Fermented garlic scapes enhance your recipes without overpowering other more delicate flavours.

What is Needed…

– Fresh organic garlic scapes, cleaned and diced into small pieces or use a food processor.  Do not overwork and turn scapes into a paste.  Leave it a bit chunky.
– Organic sunflower oil, cold pressed.  1 to 2 tbsp per 8oz of diced scapes.
– Lactic starter or use wild yeast fermentation
– Salt to taste

Directions…

Mix the diced garlic scapes with the oil and salt.
Add the lactic starter (This can come from other ferments liquids, like kraut or just use wild yeast fermentation.)
– Once fermentation is to your liking, about 5 to 10 days or more.   If you like the taste, finish with 1 to 2 teaspoons of organic apple cider vinegar or to taste.

Once the fermentation process is finished, pack into jars and store in the refrigerator.  Hint: Smaller jars will keep the FGS fresher.
Use as a spread or garnish for your favorite snacks, with fresh bread, or even on pizza.
Enjoy!

~ Pickled Wild Leek Relish ~

wild leek relish
One of my favorite ways to use and preserve leeks for use all season long!  The relish condiment works as a topping, great with fresh bread, or added during plating a dish.
Quick and easy, and so good!

What is Needed…

As the leeks are very strong in taste and flavor, you will use more white onions vs. leeks.  If you were to use only wild leeks, it will be much too strong.  I found this out on the first try with only leeks and vinegar…to much!

– White onions, organic, peeled and diced into very small pieces or use a food processor (do not overwork)
– Smaller amount of fresh leek bulbs, wild crafted, depending on flavour.
– A red bell pepper, organic
– White vinegar or rice wine vinegar, organic
– Salt to taste

Directions…

– Peel and dice white onions into very small pieces.
– Clean and peel wild leeks.  Remove tops and roots, leaving nice
clean white bulbs
– Depending on the size; use about a ¼ of the red bell pepper,
diced  finely.
The bell pepper is more to give a bit of colour over flavor.
– Mix the three together in a ratio of 80% white onion, 15% wild
leeks, & 4% bell pepper.

Taste the mixture and adjust the amount of leeks to onions until you have a flavor you like.  Add salt and vinegar (About 1% of mixture) to taste.  As with any pickled foods, the product should have a vinegar bite, but not to much to over power the other flavors.  The acid content should read at pH 4.5 or a little lower.  The correct range test strip can be purchased here.  Allow to set at room temperature for a few days, taste again and adjust ingredients to your liking.
Once complete pack into jars, cap, and place in refrigerator.

Enjoy! and Happy Fermenting… Live, Grow, Share Cultured Foods

 


 

 

To Error is Human…

Making cultured foods and beverages are not hard if one follows some basic rules, common sense, and of course safety factors. Our ancestors have been doing this all around the world for a 1000 years or more. Wild fermentation can produce some great ferments, however, the results can very from batch to batch depending on the types of wild yeast and bacteria
within the food stock.
fermented chili peppersHaving a traditional starter culture ensures the same results each time. An example is making beer with wild yeast vs. using a brewers yeast. The outcome could be close in taste and flavor to each other or very different, with the wild yeast sometimes making the beer unpalatable. Having a tried and true recipe helps to make sure the results are the same every time, too. Checking acidic levels and having the correct microorganisms, like lactobacillales, ensure cultured food safety.
Especially in wild fermentation.

Now For the Errors…

Being busy here in the lab sometimes it is easy to forget a step in a recipe or process (Why to double check and taste things). A resent example that I have done was when making a batch of ginger beer/brew. I have made this recipe so many times I don’t even refer to it anymore. Well being in a rush one day had all the steps completed…water heated, sugar dissolved, lemon added for a small batch of brew. Waiting for temperature to decrease to room temperature and then on to bottling. Batch was then bottled
and set out for 3 days for the ginger culture to
produce a fizzy beverage.

ginger beer starter
Old time ginger brew beer in clay bottle

After the waiting period is was time to try it out. A nice chilled ginger brew on a long hot day…yeah! The bottle is opened and to my surprise, no fizz. Then tasting it I knew what had went wrong…no ginger starter culture was added before bottling. No flavor and no fizz, just lemon sugar water. At that point nothing to do but uncap them all, dump it, and start over.

The lesson here is to taste and follow a recipe to get the results one wants. Don’t try to get to crazy with flavors and adding to many things at a time. A great example is people adding to much fruit or juice when bottling kombucha tea or water kefir and then wondering why the bottles explode all over. Another example is trying to make a crazy kimchi blend and it turning out ‘wrong’ or not having a good flavor. Hard to tell what went wrong with to many factors vs adding one or two things to the mix and waiting for the outcome. I hope this short post will help everyone to become a better fermenter and produce
great tasting fermented and cultured foods.
There are many tried and true recipes on our sister site here.
Happy Culturing!