Tag Archives: seaweed

~ Miyeok guk – beef/seaweed soup ~

miyeok guk soup
Miyeokguk soup ready to eat

A simple soup that can be enjoyed by everyone, classic is wakame seaweed and beef. However, several types of meat can be used including beef, chicken, mussels, or even tofu.

This staple soup also is the soup that new moms eat for the first few weeks after giving birth because of the nutrients contained in miyeok that help with recovery and the production of breast milk.  In Korea, this soup is part of the hospital diet for new moms.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 ounces dried miyeok yields about 3 cups soaked
  • 5 ounces beef stew meat or brisket
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons soup soy sauce gukganjang
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 10 cups of water
Wakame seaweed

Instructions

  • Soak the dried miyeok for about 30 minutes. Rinse 2 or 3 times thoroughly. Drain after each rinse, and squeeze or knead (as if you are working with bread dough) to remove excess salt used in the drying process and rinse off any hidden sand. Drain well, and cut into bite sizes.
  • Cut the beef/meat into thin bite size pieces. Marinate with 1 tablespoon of soup soy sauce, garlic, and a pinch of pepper.
  • Heat a large pot over medium high heat. Sauté the meat with the sesame oil just until the meat is done.
  • Add the miyeok and 1 tablespoon of soup soy sauce, and continue to sauté for 4 to 5 minutes.
  • Add the water, and bring it to a boil. Skim off any scum. Add salt and pepper to taste. Lower the heat to medium low. Boil, covered, for 20 to 30 minutes until the meat is tender and the broth is slightly milky.

We use a mix of different sea vegetables including wakame, raw sheet nori, hijiki, and fueru wakame. But feel free to use what is on hand. The seaweed can be slightly fermented for 12 hrs to add probiotics.

~ Simple Japanese Nori Condiments ~

Japan condiments nori

5 Fermented Recipes for Classic Sea Vegetable Japanese Condiments

Tsukudani (佃煮) is small seafood, meat or seaweed that has been simmered in soy sauce and mirin.
High osmotic pressure preserves the ingredients.
Its name originates from Tsukudajima, the island (in present-day Chūō, Tokyo) where it was first made in the Edo period. Many kinds of tsukudani are sold. Traditionally made tsukudani is preservable and has been favored as a storable side dish in Japanese kitchens since the Edo period.

Tsukudani can be made with kombu, nori, or wakame seaweeds. It is usually eaten with steamed rice as a flavoring agent since the flavor is very intense (approximately 1 tbsp for one bowl of rice). Finished tsukudani is served chilled from the refrigerator where it takes on a gelatinous texture.

Here are some simple to make Japanese condiments. All of the raw nori seaweed is ground, mixed with other ingredients, and then slightly fermented for 2 to 3 days. Then keep jars in the refrigerator for longer shelf life. We like to use smaller jars like 1/2 pint size for a fresher product and ease of table use.

Make these fresh healthy seaweed condiments to enhance plan rice or other entrees.

– Gohandesuyo, Seaweed Paste

Nori seaweed with shoyu and dashi broth

Simple to make by grinding nori sheets then adding shoyu soy sauce and dashi broth until the desired consistency is obtained. Add a bit of water if needed to make a thick paste.
Mix all the ingredients and pack into jars. Ferment for 2 to 3 days at room temperature then
place in refrigerator.

– Red Pepper, Nori Seaweed Paste

Nori seaweed with chili oil

Make the same as Gohandesuyo with the addition of chillis to your liking. You can buy a premade chili paste or make it fresh. The amount of chili to nori can vary by the type of pepper used and taste.
Add a bit of water if needed to make a thick paste.
Mix all the ingredients and pack into jars. Ferment for 2 to 3 days at room temperature then
place in refrigerator.

– Umebosi Pickled Plum Nori Tsukudani

umeboshi plum tsukudani

This condiment is nice and sweet from the plumbs and contains a depth of flavor from the shiso.

Again make as you would gohandesuyo but now mixed with umeboshi plums/paste and fresh shiso leaf. Mix all the ingredients and pack into jars. Ferment for 2 to 3 days at room temperature then
place in refrigerator.

Yuzu Kosho Tsukudani

Yuzu lemon peel and chilis are added to the basic nori seaweed paste…

Start with grinding the nori sheets and adding yuzu peel and chili to taste. Mix all the ingredients and pack into jars. Ferment for 2 to 3 days at room temperature then place in refrigerator.

Taberu Rayu Tsukudani

Chili oil with fried onions and garlic…

Start by frying off onions in sesame oil then add the garlic and fry till all ingredients are finished. Remove from heat. Now add in the chili oil to form
a thick paste.

The ratio is about 2 parts onions to 1 part garlic and 1 part chili oil. Of course, this can be changed to your liking. A little soy sauce and sugar can also be added. Mix all the ingredients and pack into jars. Ferment for 2 to 3 days at room temperature then
place in refrigerator.

Other flavor types to try…
– Kameya Wasabi Nori Seaweed Tsukudani
– Nori Tsukudani Shijimi(clams) Seasoned
– Yasuda Yakinori Iri Tsukudani (Nori in sweet shoyu)

Try it with different meat, seafood, or othe types of sea vegiables.

Condiments can enhance dishes and provide healthy flavors to dishes. Have fun making these delightful additions to meals.

Happy Culturing! Live, Grow, Share Cultured Foods
.