Tag Archives: kombucha

Kombucha Fermentation and It’s Antimicrobial Activities

Below you will find studies on kombucha cultures of yeast and bacteria and how it produces antimicrobial compounds for
protection from foreign invaders.  Besides acetic acid, which is produced during the fermentation process,
kombucha is thought to have other factors and compounds
that may aid in these protective factors.

Kombucha Fermentation and Its Antimicrobial Activity

Journal Agric Food Chem. 2000 Jun;48(6):2589-94
Sreeramulu G, Zhu Y, Knol W.
Department of Applied Microbiology and Gene Technology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands.

kombucha lab testingKombucha was prepared in a tea broth (0.5% w/v) supplemented with sucrose (10% w/v) by using a commercially
available starter culture. The pH decreased steadily from 5 to 2.5 during the fermentation while the weight of the “tea fungus” and the OD of the tea broth increased through 4 days of the fermentation and remained fairly constant thereafter. The counts of acetic acid-producing bacteria and yeasts in the broth increased up to 4 days of fermentation and decreased afterward. The antimicrobial activity of Kombucha was investigated against iaa number of pathogenic microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterolitica,  Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermis, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis,  Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Helicobacterpylori, and Listeria monocytogenes were found to be sensitive to Kombucha. According to the literature on Kombucha, acetic acid is considered to be responsible for the inhibitory
effect toward a number of microbes tested,
and this is also valid in the present study.

However, in this study, Kombucha proved to exert antimicrobial activities against E. coli, Sh. sonnei, Sal. typhimurium, Sal. enteritidis, and Cm. jejuni, even at neutral pH and
after thermal denaturation.

This finding suggests the presence of antimicrobial compounds other than acetic acid and large proteins in Kombucha.

kombucha in lab


The Yeast Spectrum of the ‘Tea Fungus’

Mycoses. 1995 Jul-Aug;38(7-8):289-95
Kombucha’.Mayser P, Fromme S, Leitzmann C, Grunder K.
Department of Dermatology and Andrology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany.

kombucha yeat spectrumThe tea fungus ‘Kombucha’ is a symbiosis of Acetobacter, including Acetobacter xylinum as a characteristic species, and various yeasts. A characteristic yeast
species or genus has not yet been identified. Kombucha is mainly cultivated in sugared black tea to produce a slightly acidulous effervescent beverage that is said to have several curative effects. In addition to sugar, the beverage contains small amounts of alcohol and various acids, including acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid, as well as some antibiotic substances.

To characterize the yeast spectrum with special consideration given to facultatively pathogenic yeasts, two commercially available specimens of tea fungus and 32 from private households in Germany were analysed by micromorphological and biochemical methods. Yeasts of the genera Brettanomyces, Zygosaccharomyces and Saccharomyces were identified in 56%, 29% and 26% respectively. The species Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Candida kefyr were only demonstrated in
isolated cases. Furthermore, the tests revealed pellicle-forming yeasts such as Candida krusei or Issatchenkia orientalis/ occidentalis as well as species of the apiculatus yeasts (Kloeckera, Hanseniaspora). Thus, the genus Brettanomyces may be a typical group of yeasts that are especially adapted to the environment of the tea fungus. However, to investigate further the beneficial effects of tea fungus, a spectrum of the other typical genera must be defined. Only three specimens showed definite contaminations. In one case, no yeasts could be isolated because of massive contamination with Penicillium spp. In the remaining two samples (from one household),
Candida albicans was demonstrated.

The low rate of contamination might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances.
Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha.
However, those suffering from immuno-suppression should preferably consume controlled commercial
Kombucha beverages.

Happy Culturing!

Kombucha Culture Strains Worldwide

  The name Kombucha or Kombu Cha refers to any of a variety of preparations of fermented, lightly effervescent sweetened black or green tea beverages that are commonly used as functional beverages for their detoxifying and other health benefits. Kombucha is found in many cultures in
China it is called: chájūn (茶菌),
Japanese: kōcha-kinoko (紅茶キノコ),
Korean: hongchabeoseotcha (홍차버섯차),
and Russian: chaynyy grib (чайный гриб).
kombucha tea culture
In this Blog page, we are talking not of different flavorings of kombucha, whether through herbs, fruits or sugars but to different strains themselves.  Today in the west, other kombucha type ferments or stains are known as kombu tea SCOBY, JUN or Jun Honey culture, Snow leopard, Monk Tea, Himalayan strain, and Kocha-Konko Kombu. Much is unknown on the origins of the strains, how they traveled the globe, and their culture makeup.  We have traveled throughout the world looking for new cultures, like our water kefir strains and yogurts.
We have brought back kombucha tea cultures from many places.
Friends and customers have sent them, too.

  Many call the kombucha culture a ‘mushroom’, however, KT does not produce spores like fungi mushrooms and really is a culture or SCOBY of yeasts and bacteria. Kombucha production starts by fermenting a tea/sugar solution using a “symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast strains (SCOBY)”. The actual contributing microbial populations in the kombucha cultures vary, but the yeast component generally includes Saccharomyces and other species, and the bacterial component usually includes Gluconacetobacter xylinus to oxidize yeast-produced alcohols to
acetic and other organic acids.

kombucha showing CO2Common Kombucha Strain – Most widely known strain in the USA and the west. Many sellers are producing cultures for sale over the internet. The culture produces the familiar taste and
standard flavor used by commercial and home brewers alike.
Traditionally kombucha maintained with black tea and cane sugar.

Monk Kombucha teaKombucha Monk Tea Strain – A strain from Tibet made with raw honey, Pu-erh tea, and herbs like goji berries. This strain produces a rose-colored culture and taste unlike the standard strain. Procured from monks in different Tibetan monasteries,
it is one of our favorites!

forbidden city strainsImperial Place Strain – Imperial Place strain is not very renowned or even seen by the common masses. Said to be for royalty only. Chinese legend says that even the palace workers may not view the culture. This culture type seems unavailable to the public and only known through legend. The stories may be true or
just a myth, only time may tell.

kombucha tea cultureRussian Red Rose Strain – A strain called ‘chaynyy grib’, said to have survived World War II by using ingredients on hand. In this culture strain’s, upkeep and tradition, brewing happened mainly with herbs (such as rose hips and elder berries) vs. tea, with the introduction of honey or sugar beets as the sweetening agent verses processed cane sugars. Tea and sugar was rationed or unavailable to the common person at that time. Over time, this culture has adapted to the new ingredients. It produces a red colored culture from the beets and herbs
used in the brewing cycle.
Today many people use sugar again due to availability, however,
traditionalist still use the old style recipes.

Japanese Kombu ChaJapanese Kocha Kinoko Kombu Strain – Supported with matcha green tea and sea vegetables Kombu Cha is very healing culture strain. Kombu Kombucha provides umami flavor, nutrients, anti-oxidants, and minerals from the matcha tea and seaweeds used. This strain produces a very clear white culture unlike
the traditional kombucha culture.

Himalayan Kombucha Himalayan Kombucha Strain – Regionally sustained kombucha strain from Northern India. Most likely, this strain of scoby migrated from China or Tibet through the trade routes. This kombucha strain is maintained on raw sugars and fruits, with no tea used in the fermentation process. Tea is an expensive commodity to many in India and may be why this strain developed without the need for tea in the brewing process.

JUN honey cultureJun Honey Culture – Becoming more popular in the west.  Some brewers and sellers of cultures try using a kombucha culture with honey; however, this does not make it JUN.
However, close to kombucha culture it is a culture strain unto it’s self. Sometimes it is called kombucha honey culture.

It is widely found in parts of western Tibet. Each province of China has a version of Chang beer, in some parts of Tibet the beer has Jun in it. The most easily found and tastiest Jun in Tibet comes from the Khampa Nomads – former monks turned physical and spiritual warriors who learned their knowledge of how to make Jun from the Bonpo monks. The warrior/monks would carry the JUN with them as they rode into battle using it as a tonic,
energy booster, and maybe a little alcohol, too!

JUN snow leopard strainSnow Leopard JUN Strain – The rarest form of Jun is the “snow leopard” and one taste gives the equivalent effect of increased energy and stamina.  The Bonpo monks who produce this fine Jun are of Taoist, Buddhist, and Shamanic origins and are thought to have been gifted a heirloom culture by Lao Tzu.
This Jun strain is very, very hard to find.

We hope you have found this blog page helpful in learning more about kombucha types and introducing people to new strains from other areas around the world.  We are always on the lookout for more cultures to add to the ‘culture bank’, which allows others access to less common culture types.  We have some of the culture strains listed above that are available at our culture store/bank.  Instructions for the cultures we maintain can be found on our main website www.organic-cultures.com.

Happy Culturing!
Live, Grow, and Share Cultured Foods.

~ pH Readings for Kombucha & Fermented Food Cultures ~

Why Check pH Levels in the Kombucha Tea Beverage & Other Ferments?

Though pH readings is not always needed, adding pH checks to the culturing process helps to maintain proper viable and healthy culture strains/starter. Each type of starter culture will produce different amounts of acid as part of the fermentation process. Checking these levels, insure that your cultured foods and ferments are safe to consume. For the safety factor, all ferments should measure below 4.6 on the pH scale, as per FDA regulations. This insures that the cultured food is free of human pathogens, safe to consume, and that the desired bacteria/yeast cultures are viable and does not become overrun by foreign yeasts or bacteria.

pH test strip,
How Does Fermentation/Culturing Work?

Fermented foods, which are foods produced or preserved by the action of microorganisms, are great for health and well-being of the body systems (especially the intestinal/gut system). In this context, fermentation typically refers to the fermentation of sugar to alcohol using yeast, but other fermentation processes involve the use of bacteria such as lactobacillus, including the making of foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut.
The art and knowledge of fermentation had been around for 1000’s of years and the scientific community calls it zymology. We call it wild fermentation or raw cultured foods.

It all starts by choosing the culture starter medium, such as kombucha tea culture or kefir grains, then ‘feeding’ the culture with the correct food source. After the recommended fermentation time the cultured food is ready to consume or used for making other cultured food products. An example would be making milk kefir and then using the ready cultured milk to make RAW living cheeses. Testing the pH before and after the process insures that the finished product is safe for consumption.
Many pickled or soured foods ferment, thus dropping the pH levels, as part of the pickling or souring process, like Japanese pickles. However, many preserved/fermented food stores go through a process of brining, vinegar induction, or the addition of other acidic foods sources such as lemon juice.

How to Test pH Correctly

Correct procedures when checking the pH levels allows for the most accurate readings. A short-range strip (o-6 pH) works the best over a broad range strip (0-14 pH). Human or saliva testing strips will not work due to the range of the product, from 5 – 8 pH. If you have purchased testing strips from us then the process is very easy. Simply open the roll of kombucha ‘test strip papers’ (0-6 pH range) and remove about an inch long piece of testing paper. Make sure the hands are clean and dry.

Check the pH reading by pulling a small sample of the ferment vs. placing the test paper in the ferment. Use a straw, spoon, or ‘wine thief’ to pull a sample to test. Dip the kombucha/culture test strip into the liquid to check. Then with a flick of the wrist, remove any excess liquid and immediately check the pH against the color-coded chart. The check should be within the desired range for the ferment tested, see below.

pH and Dairy Cultures

dairy kefir grains
With dairy type cultures, such as milk kefir or yogurt starters, the pH is high to start with a drop in pH as the milk is cultured. There is not a starting point to check pH with dairy cultures. At the end of the process, the pH should read 4.5 or lower on a
color-coded pH chart.

pH and Water Kefir Strains

Water Kefir Grains
Water kefir grains act somewhat like the dairy kefir in that the initial pH test will be on the alkaline side of the scale. Depending on the strength of the old starter liquid, the test may fall within the correct range. Why we recommend use a slice of lemon to lower the pH and keep it below 4.5 pH.

pH and Kombucha Tea Cultures

kombucha tea culture
For kombucha tea beverage, you should take two pH readings. One check is done when adding the starter tea to the new batch of tea/sugar solution and the second at the end of the brewing cycle.
This first pH test reading should be 4.5 pH or below, if it is too high then keep adding starter tea from your old batch
until the desired pH is reached.
Many kombucha recipes found online have a certain generic amount of starter tea added to a new batch. However, depending on the acidic strength of the old starter tea the amount added will vary from batch to batch. One may find that only a small amount is needed from a strong sour batch and much more required from a sweet batch of tea.
Adding the correct amount of starter, by reading pH, insures that the fresh tea solution is acidic enough to combat any human pathogens, foreign molds, or yeast.

Measure the second pH test at the finish of the brewing/culturing process. After your tea has brewed for the required amount for time,  7 to 14 days in most cases, then it is recommended to test the pH until it is at, or close, to 3 pH.
The desired range of the complete kombucha tea
is between 3.2 and 2.8 pH.
This reading tells you that the brewing cycle is complete and the tea is at the correct pH point to drink. Of course, this can very a bit to suit your needs and taste. If this final pH is too far on the alkaline side of the pH scale, then the tea will need a few more days to complete the brewing cycle.

pH and JUN Honey Culture

jun honey culture
Many people now have access to the JUN honey culture. JUN is much like kombucha culture, yet a different strain and results. The ingredients in JUN are different from kombucha tea culture. Kombucha is made with black tea and cane sugar, whereas, JUN is created using honey and a lighter tea,  such as white or green tea.
For checking pH levels, the steps and range is the same as kombucha tea.

We hope this post on checking kombucha pH levels in kombucha and other ferment will help in producing healthy and safe fermented beverages.  See all our products at our culture store.

Happy Culturing!
Live, Grow, and Share Cultured Foods

Support the Cultured Foods & Kombucha Bank

Cultured kimchi
Greeting home brewers, culturist, and foodies,
my name is Nirinjan and we are looking to expand
our production space/bank to maintain more traditional
fermented culture starts. We have collected many traditional cultures from around the world, such as yogurts, kefir, kombucha, and even spores. Our goal is to maintain these cultures and bring access to these cultures for home use and those looking
for better health and wellbeing.

As you know, we already have a website/store and have sent 1000’s of culture starters to customers worldwide, see www.organic-cultures.com  Our small team has worked with cultures starters for over 15 years.  The space currently used for production and lab work is getting to small for the number of cultures and high customer demand, so we are asking for funds to obtain a larger working space and install needed kitchen equipment.

Your funding will help us maintain these live, raw, traditional cultures (some over 200 years old) in our ‘bank’ for all peoples to have access, now and future generations.
Click here to help –  www.gofundme.com/tf7n8qg

Thank You and Happy

 

The Never Ending…Cup of Life Updated 2/8/15

Making Pro-biotics Part of Your Daily Life and Health

Probiotic Beverage
A Cup of Living Probiotic Beverage

As we move into the new year, many people strive to make healthier choices through ‘resolutions’. Intake of living foods is vital for great health and proper digestion. Consuming living foods/pro-biotics is an easy resolution anyone can follow to increase health and wellbeing. Ways to obtain living foods can include eating a RAW food diet, fermentation of foods, or by capsule form. Capsule forms of pro-biotic are very expensive over traditional cultured foods and beverages, like live kefir cheese or ginger brew. We believe eating a diet of raw foods is as close to nature and a natural way to ingest the highest degree of nutrients. Adding fermented foods into the diet allows a higher degree of pro-biotics intake over a standard a raw diet, assists in absorption of nutrients, and provides a much greater array of healthy foods.
 
  Here at Organic-Cultures, we use a method that insures daily pro-biotic intake. We call it ‘The Cup of Life’! Without beneficial yeast and bacteria, human life would not subsist. This method would fall under fermentation and RAW food choices. Using the ‘Cup’ method is very simple to implement into your daily routine. First, you will need a drinking container, water bottle, etc. A quart size vessel seems to work best. Next, fill your container with your favorite water type cultured food drink. Liquid type cultures work better than dairy culture starters. Your choices range from any type of water kefir grains, kombucha tea or JUN, and ginger brew. One may mix different types/strains of fermented beverage to increase the pro-biotic array
(Be careful not to contaminate your pure culture strains).

Water Kefir Grains
Choose your mix of probiotics to produce a fizzy beverage.

Decided on a pro-biotic source(s) and simply add some fresh pieces of fruit and/or juice along with the active cultivated source. One may add pieces of the water kefir grains or other culture, if desired. The next part is where the real action begins! As the cultured beverage sits, the active bacteria and yeast strains will start to consume the sugars within the fruits/juice. As you drink this mixture throughout the day, keep refilling the container with fresh juice and water mixture. At night, loosely cover and in the morning there should be a nice fizzy beverage ready to consume throughout the day. Since the ingredients are cultured, the beverage can stay out for several days with no worries of contamination or refrigeration.

Photo updates 2/8/15
IMG_0297 Photo updates 2/8/15

Tips:

– Keep at room temperature to keep the cultures producing and fermenting

– If stored in a container with lid make sure to open slowly in case of pressure buildup –
or leave your drinking vessel open.
– Cut fruit into larger pieces to prevent a chocking hazard

– Make sure to change out the container from time to time for hygienic reasons

– If you like a colder beverage…just add ice.

 As always…

Happy Culturing through the New Year.      Live, Grow, Share Cultured Foods!

Update on the living cultured drink…10.31.2015

It is been many months of drinking with this same culture sample.  It is providing a great fizzy beverage every day without much work.  This glass of never ending life filling probiotics is done with the grape kefir grains which are larger then traditional water kefir grains.  Just add some fresh juice,  cut fruit, water kefir, or even a little kombucha tea.  It’s been working for many months and provides a drinkable beverage day or night.  If made before going to sleep, the beverage will be fizzy by morning, with a head like beer does.  Carry this around throughout the day and people will ask what is floating in your drink.  A great way to tell them about living beverages and probiotics!
Happy Culturing!


 

 

Why Have a Backup of Your Kombucha Culture ?

   We are asked by people on a daily basis, what to do with a kombucha mushroom culture that may not be working as great as it did when the culture starter was new. The common problems are no fizz, culture not reproducing, or off smells. This is one of the main reasons for keeping a back-up of your culture. You will want to have a replacement on hand if something happens to your main brewing Kombucha culture or also known as a ‘mother’. If a replacement is needed, keeping a backup also allows a new batch to get going without having to find or wait for a replacement culture to be shipped.
kombucha in brewing jar

Through Neglect, a Kombucha Mushroom Culture can Become Unusable Under These Conditions:

– Leaving the tea for a long time with adding fresh tea/sugar solution.

– Contamination with mold.  These happens when the pH is not acidic enough.  Note: Mold will always grow on top of the tea culture.

– Contamination via insects, gnats, or fruit flies Can happen if jar is not covered and secured properly

– Replacement needed due to miss-handling Jar drops, handling with unclean hands or utensils, broken jar/glass.

  By keeping a back-up on hand or several containers brewing at once the need to pay for or search for a replacement will not be needed.  With each brewing cycle, the kombucha mushroom will reproduce itself so there will be plenty of fresh back-ups to keep.  You may keep a replacement culture in some fresh tea solution stored covered in the refrigerator or again keep several jars going at once.

Other sources say that the kombucha culture can be frozen or dried in a dehydrator and still stay active.

Thanks for checking out our Blog page and Happy Culturing!
Live, Grow, Share Cultured Foods.

~ Top 4 Kombucha Tea Brewing Questions & Answers ~

Q. My package is expanded during shipment. Is it still good?

A. Nothing is wrong with the culture starter and this happens normally during shipment. It’s a good sign, meaning the kombucha ‘mushroom’ culture is viable and living. Remember this is live and active cultures of yeast and bacteria your working with.

Best to open the package and place in a clean jar with lid, until use. Make sure to get your first batch going ASAP!

 

kombucha sinks
As seen by the photo on the left, one
culture has sunk to the bottom while the
other kombucha culture is at the top.
Note that both containers are forming a
new mushroom on top of the tea solution.

Q. Just made the first batch of kombucha tea and the starter mushroom sinks to the bottom. Is it bad?

  1. Nothing is wrong, if your kombucha culture mushroom sinks when placed in the new tea solution. After a few days and with the build up of CO2, the culture will in most cases rise to the surface. When selecting which cultures to brew your new batch of tea with choosing a mushroom culture that floats will help jump start the brewing process and provide an extra level of protection. If the culture floats then the tea starts culturing from the top down. When a culture does sink, the culture growth works from the bottom up. Even if the mother culture does not start to float, do not worry, as the new culture layer will always form on the top of the tea solution. This is one reason to add ‘starter tea’ when making a new batch to aid in inoculating the tea solution.
kombucha showing CO2
…Tiny Bubbles…

Q. My finished Kombucha tea has no effervescence. How can I make it fizzy?

A. People in the USA are custom having fizzy drinks and the finished kombucha or Jun beverage, making little bubbles as it is poured into a glass, is what one desires.

A few things are easy to change yet effect the outcome of the finished product…
Temperature is the number one factor in producing effervescence. If the temperature is to low or high, the amount of carbonation varies. A temperature of 75 to 80 deg F does the trick in most cases.

Yeast change sugars into alcohol, producing carbonation as a side effect. Happy yeast colonies make more fizz! Adding a bit more sugar or trying a different type could help add more fizz. However, just adding more sugar won’t always do the trick. Too much sugar can make the yeast sluggish and slow. Like people after the ‘all you can eat buffet’

Try Changing Tea type of tea you use. Aged or black teas seem to produce more carbonation.

We also find that having more than one mother culture in a jar seems to seal it off better. This holds in more carbonation, which one can see being released as the kombucha culture is removed.

mold on kombuchaQ. I think I have mold on the tea culture…what do I do?
Mold on the kombucha mushroom culture is a common question we are asked here. What does mold look like compared with the dying yeast cultures that are common during the kombucha or JUN brewing cycle? A simple answer is that most mold or foreign growth will look like mold that occurs on other type of food such as bread or cheese. Most will be fuzzy and brown or green in colour. Any type of mold or fungus growing on top of the kombucha mushroom is cause to discard the whole mushroom culture due to contamination. See our older Blog post for more on kombucha and mold.

What is Not Mold: Sometimes the culture will produce brownish streamers or what is described as a string or web-like in appearance or growth, which hangs down into the tea. This is not mold or contamination and are simply old, dead yeast cells that have completed their life cycle.
These are fine to consume, however, many people like to strain these out before bottling the finished beverage. Sometimes the mushroom itself will form a brown area by the edge of the glass, which may look like mold. This must be examined closely as this, too, may simple be dead kombucha yeast cells. At other times, the mushroom culture will develop whitish coloured bumps on the surface of the liquid. These are sometimes mistaken for mold; however, they are simply small bubbles of carbonic acid just under the newly developing skin. The new culture will continue to fill out and cover these within a few days. But most important, if you are unsure of anything or suspect something is wrong! Do NOT Drink the Tea!

Thanks for checking out the Blog page and Happy Culturing!
Live, Grow, Share Cultured Foods

Checkout our culture specials this weekend at our store page.
We have some free kombucha cultures with certain orders.
See details at the Organic-Cultures Store


 

 

Kombucha Tea – Tips & Tricks 7/16/14 – Summertime Kombucha Tea

Kombucha tea in the summer
Kombucha tea in the summer

Summertime Kombucha

As any long term brewer knows, kombucha brews different in the long summer days vs. the colder winter months. To make the prefect summer kombucha tea beverage a change in ingredients, length of time, and temperature are required. Below are some tips to keep your kombucha tea happy and producing a great pro-biotic beverage.
–         As temperatures get higher, the brewing time will decrease. This can be a benefit; however, too short of brewing time will not produce the highest amounts of organic acids and pro-biotics. If living in a hotter climate finding a cooler place (basement, climate controlled space, etc.) may be necessary.
–         Keep the temperature of the liquid (not ambient temp) at recommend brewing temperature range. Standard temperature is between 70 to 80 Degrees F. Doing so will allow for the proper brewing times. If you kombucha tea is ready within just a few of days then the temperature is most likely to high, which greatly effects time.
–         During the summer months, we brew with lighter teas, like green or white organic. This seems to suit the hotter weather over a black or fermented tea. In addition, the yeast will consume more sugar when the temperatures are high, so use 1 ½ cups organic sugar vs. the standard 1 cup.
–         BUGS! If brewing kombucha through a season one will see how much fruit flies love the yeast in kombucha tea. The flies can be a real problem and will even be attracted from outside. Simple solution is to make a fruit fly trap which is very simple to do. Just take around a ½ cup of old kombucha liquid starter and place into small container. To this, add one or two drops of dish soap. The soap breaks the water tension and kills the flies when they land on it.
Once too many fruit flies are in the container it will have to be changed and refreshed to attract more bugs.

We hope these tips and tricks will help you brew great tea during the summer time.
Look for more tips each week and as always…

Happy Brewin’!
Kombucha tea in Grolsch

LIVE, GROW, SHARE CULTURED FOODS !

Summer Time Special…

Summer Time Special

There is still time to get a free JUN culture from our store:

http://store.organic-cultures.com/

Spend $50 or more and get a free JUN culture as a way of us saying thank you
for your support. Harry only 3 free JUN cultures left!

Remember your purchase from us goes to maintaining these culture starts
and allows us to procure more types of culture starters. Holding onto these traditional food starter cultures allows us a larger array of food stocks, preservation, and natural pro-biotics.
Thank you again for your support.

We’re Back to Culture…You! With JUN !

Greetings All!

We have not posted of late to the Blog.  We have been traveling about the planet looking for new food cultures to pass along to you.

It has been a very great outcome!!!  In the near future, we will tell you more about the food cultures in detail.

At the store page, there is now JUN cultures (somewhat like kombucha tea), a new Russian Rose kombucha strain (using traditional old school rosehips & elder berries),  and topping it all off is Sea Rice from India!

You can visit our store front at any time to read more on these new food cultures
http://store.organic-cultures.com

JUN

Jun Culture
Jun Honey Culture – Like Kombucha

What is Jun?  Those of you who are familiar with Kombucha may have heard of its rarer cousin, Jun.
Kombucha is a slightly different fermentation process from Jun, and contains different strains of bacteria.
Some call Jun Honey Culture the ‘champagne of kombucha’ due to its slightly sweeter more exotic qualities.
Jun taste like a raw honey mead with a sour note – fizzy sweet with a tangy back taste.

Jun Honey Culture
Jun Honey Culture use Raw Honey

Kombucha is made by the fermentation of raw sugar and brewed black tea by a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast –
also known as a SCOBY.  It likes warm, humid climates and takes an average of 5 to 14 days to ferment –
once the fermentation process starts

Jun, on the other hand, is a fermentation of raw honey and brewed green or white tea also by a SCOBY.  However, since Jun
was widely brewed and cultivated in the colder Tibetan regions, it may take longer to ferment and reproduce a new JUN culture if the climate is cold.  It likes slightly cooler temperatures and seems to have as shorter brewing cycle, 3 to 7 days,
to complete the fermentation process if temperature are higher, around 65 to 70 deg F.

Jun, is known to some as the ‘champagne of kombucha’, it is like a honey mead when finished brewing   The fact remains that this is still a relatively unknown quantity with a deep mystery and reverence surrounding it.  The oral tradition of Jun goes back several millennia and it is thought that, Lau Tsu, himself gave an heirloom culture to the monks of Bon in Tibet.

Our JUN culture was brought back from Northern China/Tibet within the last few months and is a new strain that we now carry.  The price is higher over kombucha starter, due to the cost of ingredients (raw honey) and the rarity of the strain.  You will maintain the Jun culture strain (oc-0978JUN) on a food source of raw or pasteurized honey and good quality green or white tea.  Darker black teas are not recommened.

Buy your Jun honey starter culture today and start making this new honey beverage that is x2 as good as kombucha tea!

Next posting we’ll talk about the Russian Red Rose kombucha strain (oc-0643RRR)
Talk to everyone again soon.  Until Then…Happy Culturing!