Category Archives: Fermentation

Fermentation tips and tricks for the beginner or experienced culturist.

Fermented Beet and Cultured Goat Cheese Spread

~ Fermented Beet and Goat Cheese ~

beet kvass
Shockingly pink beet colour, this spread makes a wonderful appetizer or addition to a cheese plate. Roasting the beets in their skins retains their intense color.  This recipe uses two cultures of beets and cheese.  Use this spread on toasted bread/flat bread, crackers, or as part of a cheese plate.

Ingredients Needed…

Fermented beet kvass, about 2 beets worth, skin on or off
– 2 teaspoons olive oil
– Pinch of salt
– Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
– 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
– Juice of ½ orange, fresh
– 4 ounces soft goat cheese (chèvre)

Directions…

making beet spread
1.  Use beets from the fresh made beet kvass.
2.  Cut into small pieces and purée in food processor with olive oil.
3.  Add balsamic vinegar and orange juice and mix until smooth.
4.  Add goat cheese and mix for another minute or two.
5.  Taste and adjust seasonings as desired.

Keep refrigerated.
Live, Grow, and Share Cultured Foods…Happy Culturing!
See our online store for all your culturing needs – store.organic-cultures.com

Lemongina / Limegina Drink

~ Fermented – Vegan ~

 Lemongina
This is an excellent fermented sports drink containing electrolytes, vitamins, and some protein.   Easy top make with some common ingredients.  Very refreshing when a pick-me-up drink is needed!

Ingredients Needed…

  • 1 Quart (1 L) filtered water
  • 1⁄2 Cup (100 g) granulated sugar or use 3/4 cup honey
  • Pinch of sea salt
  • Juice of 4 lemons, limes, or a combination
  • 1⁄2 Cup (125 ml) live Dairy whey, water kefir starter, or wild yeast fermentation
  • 1⁄4 Cup (65 g) frozen raspberries or strawberries (optional)

Lemongina

Directions…

  • Warm 1 pint (500 ml) of water in a pot over low heat. Stir in the sugar and salt until dissolved. Remove from the heat, add the remaining 1 pint (500 ml) of water, and let it cool down below body temperature. Add the lemon juice, whey, and raspberries (if using).
  • Pour the Lemongina into a glass or ceramic jar and close the lid and shake.  Write the brewing date on a piece of masking tape and stick it to the outside of the jar.
  • Let it sit at room temperature for 3 to 7 days, depending on the temperature.  Agitate at least once a day to prevent mold from forming.  Begin tasting at the first sign of bubbles. It is done when it is fizzy and sour and tangy.  Refrigerate once it reaches desired taste.  The raspberries may be removed or left in.

Yields: 4 Servings (8 oz/250 ml, Each)

strawberry Lemongina
Fresh Strawberry Lemongina

Try this refreshing beverage for those hot summer days when a nice cool drink is desired.  Said to be a great mixer for a ‘gin and tonic’. Don’t forget to check out Tepache recipe, in the files section, for a fruitier beverage also from Mexico!

For culturing starters, like kefir, koji spores, or Kombucha and fermentation supplies visit our Organic-Cultures online store.

Live, Grow, and Share Cultured Foods…Happy Culturing!

~ Fermentationed Tonics for Winter Time & Immunity Building ~

RAW – Fermented – Vegan

Fermented Garlic in Honey – Ninniku Hachimitsu-zuke

garlic in raw honey

This is a great cultured ferment for the winter season!
Easy to make and loaded with cold and flu fighting properties.
We recommend using RAW honey for the best taste and beneficial remedies.  The honey is ready in as little as 2 to 3 days.  Wait around a month or more to eat the garlic cloves and to allow full fermentation.  The garlic will start to break down if left to sit to long, best to make smaller batches to use within a month
or two after fermenting.
The honey gives a nice sweet and strong garlic flavor
for many dishes.
Or if your a garlic fan you can eat the cloves, like candy.
The garlic infused honey, when thinned down with water, makes a great hot or cold drink to enjoy or as a cold remedy!
One can find many benefits to using this recipe for
health and well being.

What is Needed:
– 10 oz (300g) Fresh garlic
– 7 to 9 oz (200-250g) Raw Honey

Directions:
1.  Start by separating the cloves of garlic, trim off the roots and outer skin.  Make sure to remove the thin membrane under the outer skin.
2.  Wash and pat the garlic dry, being careful not the break or damage the cloves.  However, some will slightly break open the cloves to activate the allicin.  The results seem to be the same, but whole cloves seem to have a longer shelf life.
3.  Prepare a small packing jar by boiling in water to sterilize, also called a water bath.
4.  Pack the garlic cloves into the sterilized container.  Pour over the honey.  Allow the honey to set for a minute and top off, making sure to cover all the cloves.
5.  Cover with lid and allow to sit in a cool dark place.  Fermentation times very, after a couple of days one should see bubbles forming in the honey mixture or even a foam on top.
6.  For those who worry about botulism, you can also add a tsp of organic raw apple cider vinegar.  This only needs to be done if the pH is to high.  The mixture should read at 4.6 pH or lower, this should happen naturally.

After a months time, place in cold storage for better long term preservation.  Enjoy!

 

~ Elderberries in Raw Honey ~

elderberry honey

  Black elderberries have a rich history in herbal medicine and elderberry syrup is a must-have in any natural cold and flu medicine chest.  Elderberry syrup gained significant attention in the natural health community shortly after the H1N1 flu outbreak when a study was released demonstrating its ability to effectively inhibit this widespread strain of the flu (Roschek, et.al., 2009).  It be bought already prepared, however, it is very easy to make at home.

What’s the Proper Way to Make Elderberry Syrup?

It’s crucial that the elderberries are from a reputable source, that all excess twigs or unripe berries are removed, and that the berries are cooked sufficiently to eliminate the toxin that is found in the seeds.  Even when elderberries are dried before cooking and the syrup is strained, it is possible for this toxin to produce complications if the syrup is not cooked sufficiently.  Remember, the purpose of an extract is to extract the active constituents from the herbs; this includes toxins.

Ingredients Needed…
To make a proper batch of safe and effective elderberry syrup, you will need:
– 100 g dried elderberries
– 1 to 2 quarts cold distilled water
– 1 1/2 cup RAW honey
– Add other items such as fresh ginger root and/or cinnamon sticks

elder berry syrup

Directions…
–  Combine the berries and water in a large (cold) sauce pan. If time permits, allow the berries to soak until they are soft, about 30 – 60 minutes.
–  Place over medium heat and gradually bring to a boil. Once a rolling boil has been reached, reduce heat to a simmer and continue to cook for 30-45 minutes, stirring frequently.  You may have to add additional water to prevent burning the berries.
–  Do not cover the pot during this phase.  This process cannot be shortened as it is crucial for eliminating the cyanide-like toxin in the seeds.  Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
–  Strain the concentrated extract and measure the liquid. It should be approximately 2 cups (If you have less than 2 cups, water can be added to reach 2 cups.  If you have more than two cups, continue boiling the mixture down.  It is crucial to have a 2-cup measurement at this state to ensure accurate dosing.  Combine with the cup and a half of honey.  Allow to cool slightly and pour into prepared bottles (which have been placed in a water bath.)
Allow to ferment a few days at room temperature, then store in the refrigerator.

Note: This can be a very active ferment.  Make sure to use an airlock or vent a couple times per day.  Even under refrigeration it will burp, due to the active wild yeast and RAW honey.

How Much Elderberry Syrup Can I Take?

The average dose used in studies to treat viral infections is 15ml of a syrup with 38% elderberry, 4x a day for adults and the same amount at a 19% concentration for children.  Commercial doses are often much less potent than those used in clinical studies.  For the equivalent of a single dose of a commercially prepared product, the formula provided above produces 35 total doses. (To determine dosing, measure the total amount of product you have and divide by 35.)

Note:  Keep in mind that the half-life of the active components in elderberry treatments is only a couple of hours total, so frequent dosing is required.  As a result, one dose per day will not be effective at either prevention or treatment.


~ Fire Cider Tonic ~

fire cider

  While most recipes for fire cider use a heavy hand with the garlic because of its potent medicinal properties, you should feel free to tweak and embrace the flexible nature of this recipe.  Fresh turmeric is a lovely substitute for dried – use about 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped or grated.  Also, one can use fresh chilies instead of dried hot chilies, use sliced fresh jalapeño or habanero, or even smoke-dried ones.  One benefit of using fresh is to impart more
wild yeast into the fermentation process.

Consider adding other citrus, such as grapefruit or blood oranges, in place of or in addition to the lemon.  Note: This tonic recipe needs to sit at room temperature and ferment for 1 month before enjoying.

fire cider tonic

Ingredients Needed…
This recipe makes around 2 cups of finished product. Fire cider tonic can be made 3 months ahead; store chilled in a (preferably glass) resealable container.

– 1 cup coarsely grated peeled horseradish (about 4 ounces)
– 1 small onion, coarsely chopped
– 8 large garlic cloves, smashed
– 1/2 cup peeled and coarsely grated or chopped ginger (about 3 ounces)
– 1 tablespoon ground turmeric
– 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
– 4 rosemary sprigs
– 1 whole clove
– 1 or 2 dried hot chilies or adjust to one’s liking
– 1 lemon, quartered/sliced or other acid type fruit
(This is a safety factor keeping the pH below the needed 4.6 pH)
– 2 cups (or more) unfiltered apple cider vinegar
– 2 tablespoons (or to taste) RAW honey

fire cider brew

Directions…
– Place horseradish, onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric, peppercorns, rosemary, and clove in quart jar.
– Crumble chilies into jar.
– Squeeze in lemon quarters; add rinds.
– Pour vinegar into jar until solids are fully submerged.
– Cover tightly, then swirl jar gently to combine.

Let stand in a dark spot 1 month.  After allotted time frame:

  1. Strain through a cheesecloth-lined colander or sieve into a large measuring cup; discard solids.  Gather up corners of cheesecloth to extract as much liquid as possible (wear gloves if you wish to avoid turmeric stains on your hands).  Rinse out jar and pour in liquid.  Add 2 Tbsp. honey, then shake covered jar or whisk to combine.  Add more honey to taste.
  2. You can transfer mixture to a few smaller bottles, such as swing-top bottles, as it’s easier to pour from this way.  Tightly seal and move into refrigerator for long term storage.

fire cider bottle

Ways to Use the Tonic…

Cold Preventative:
Sip by the spoonful when you feel a cold coming on. It can also diluted in water if taste is to strong.

Fire Cider Tea:
Add about 1 Tbsp. fire cider to a mug of hot water, along with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a little honey to sweeten. Finish with a bit of freshly ground black pepper.

Fire Cider Tonic:
This makes a great mocktail. Add about 1 Tbsp. fire cider and a squeeze of fresh orange juice to a glass of seltzer. Garnish with rosemary sprig.

Marinade:
Use on fish, chicken, or other dishes like tofu.
Think of fire cider as the acid in bright, assertive marinades similar to those for jerk chicken.

 

~ Golden Lemon Drop Honey Tonic ~

lemon honey

A great tonic for sore throats and the to combat on coming colds! This is an easy to make tonic that can be made in just a few days.
Stress can come from two places:
The inside (inflammation) and the outside (too much to do).
Sipping this brew can help ease both. The anti-inflammatory herbs turmeric and ginger offer a tangy, slightly sweet flavor that will hit the spot. Lemon balm has been found to have antimicrobial,
antioxidant, and anti-anxiety properties.

Ingredients Needed…

raw honey lemon

– Peel and juice of 1 lemon
1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated or chopped
– 1/4 tsp ground turmeric or fresh root peeled and grated/chopped
– 1 tbsp of dried or fresh rose hips.
Hint: Picking wild rose hips after the first frost turns them soft and pre-ferments them with wild yeast.
– 2 tsp RAW honey or to taste
– 2 drops food-grade lemon-balm extract (also called Melissa) or fresh herbal leaf
– 1 sprig rosemary and/or thyme, optional

This is a small batch mix so increase the ratios if a larger batch is desired.

lemon raw honey

Directions…
– Start by fermenting the peeled ginger root, turmeric, rose hips, and RAW honey.
– Allow this to set and ferment for 3 to 4 days until bubbles are forming on top of the solution.
– Once fermented add the lemon juice/peel and lemon-balm extract. If there is not an extract available, one can be made by making a lemon-balm tea decoction.
– Once all ingredients combined cover and place into refrigerator for use during the winter months.

Use by the spoonful or add to a hot green tea for relief from colds during the winter months.

Enjoy these great wintertime  tonics to combat the cold and flu season.  See more ideas and post on our main Blog page.

For culturing starters, like kefir, koji spores, or Kombucha and fermentation supplies visit our Organic-Cultures online store.

Live, Grow, and Share Cultured Foods…Happy culturing!

Punjabi-Style Cabbage with Spices

Fermented – Vegan


punjabi style cabbage
This Punjabi-Style Cabbage is an easy cabbage recipe that infuses your meal with the flavors of Punjab, a region in India. It can be made in the slow cooker, but when sauteed on the stove top it only takes about five minutes to throw together! Most Indian food recipes require a lot of preparation, but not this one – with a few spices such as turmeric and cumin, plain cabbage is transformed into an exotic new dish. Recipes with turmeric are also beneficial for your health, as turmeric is an amazing spice that helps prevent a number of ailments.
If you’ve never tried Punjabi food, this is a great starting point!

One of the first times I made this dish everyone went crazy stuffing it in a roti like a taco. This is a delicious, easy recipe that will make cooking dinner fun. The dish is traditionally made on the stove top.

Ingredients Needed…

  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (see Notes)
  • ½ yellow or red onion, peeled and diced (½ cup/75 g)
  • 1 (1 inch/2.5-cm) piece ginger root, peeled and grated or minced
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 medium potato, peeled and diced (1 cup /150 g)
  • 1 medium head white cabbage, outer leaves removed and finely shredded (about 8 cups/560 g)
  • 1 cup (145 g) peas, fresh or frozen
  • 1 green Thai, Serrano, or cayenne chili, stem removed, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon red chili powder or cayenne
  • 1½ teaspoons sea salt

punjabi style cabbage
Directions…

– First we will start by fermenting the cabbage.  Just like making kraut, start by preparing the cabbage and adding salt to make a 2% brine.  Allow to set at room temperature for a day to 3 days, or until bubbles start to form.  You can use already made kimchi or sauerkraut if you like.
– In a deep, heavy pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat.  Add the cumin, coriander, black pepper corns, and turmeric and cook until the seeds sizzle, about 30 seconds.
– Add the onion, ginger root, and garlic and cook for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.
– Add the potato. Cook for 2 minutes, until soft.
– Add the peas, chili, and red chili powder, and salt.

– Turn the heat to low and partially cover the pan.  Cook 8 to 10 minutes, some like to cook it a little longer.  Allow to cool to room temperature, then add the cabbage to maintain the fermented probiotics.

– Add the cabbage making sure all of the cabbage is mixed well with the spices and other ingredients.

Serve over rice, in a roti, or with naan bread.

Enjoy!

 

~ Daikon Radish Halves w/ Pears Pickled in Clear Broth – KimChi Recipe #4

~ Daikon Radish Halves w/ Pears
Pickled in Clear Broth ~

Dongchimi Kimchi (Traditional)
radish kimchi
This recipe is another classic winter favorite, also traditionally made during the Napa cabbage harvest, kimjang. This refreshing white kim-chi is a perfect contrast to hot, spicy soups
and hearty wintery meals.
Koreans prize the deep, savory, clean flavors of the daikon radish and choose the best, youngest, and most tender radishes for this style of kim-chi. The juices are highly desired and saved
for later use as a summertime soup base and added to noodles.

Ingredients Needed…

– 3 pounds of daikon radish, greens attached, farm fresh
– ½ cup of sea salt
– 3 large cloves of garlic, halved
– 1 inch piece of ginger root, peeled, halved,
and cut into 1/8 inch pieces
– ½ medium yellow onion, peeled and quartered
– ½ Asian pear, peeled, cored, and quartered
– 1 jalapeno pepper, halved, seeded, and cut into pieces
– 3 green onions, white and green parts
– 6 cups of water
– 1 medium russet potato, peeled.  This is added to keep the radish crisp.
dongchimi kim-chi
Directions…

– Rinse the radishes. Use a vegetable brush, clean the dirt from the radish skins, but don’t peel the outer layer.  This provides an important layer of protections during the long fermentation process.
Halve the radishes lengthwise, keeping the greens intact.
Korean radish
– In a large mixing bowl, sprinkle ¼ cup of sea salt over the radish halves and allow to sit for 16 to 24 hours. After the time drain off the liquid.
– Tightly pack the radishes into a gallon size container. Place the garlic, ginger, onion, pear, jalapeno, and green onions on top.

– In a large pan, combine the water, potato, and the remaining ¼ of sea salt. Boil to full boil and cook the potatoes for 10 minutes. Discard the potatoes and pour the hot water over the radishes.
– Cover tightly. Allow to sit at room temperature, away from direct sunlight, for one week.
– Refrigerate and allow to ferment for at least another 3 weeks before consuming.

Just prior to serving, slice radishes in half again lengthwise into quarters, then cut into ½ inch pieces. Divide among serving dishes and ladle some of the juices over the radishes.

For more recipes see us at blog.organic-cultures.com

Stuffed Cucumber Kimchi – Recipe #3 Oi Sobagi (Traditional)

Kim-chi Oi Sobagi
Oi Sobagi – Stuffed Cucumber Kimchi
(Traditional)
Fermented – Raw – Vegan

  This is a nice and easy to make quick kimchi. Classic for the summertime and are served stuffed to compliment a main dish; they are not quite a condiment and not quite a snack.
The contrasting colours make it great to brighten any dish – the vibrant green of the cucumbers and the red of the chili peppers. This is a great kim-chi for children to try for the first time if not use to foods like kim-chi!
Ingredients Needed:

Brine…

– 2 pounds of cucumbers, unpeeled but with the ends trimmed English cucumbers
– 2 tbsp of sea salt
Filling…
– ¼ cup Korean chili pepper flakes (adjust to your liking)
– 6 ounces Korean chives, finely chopped or 8 green onions, green and white parts, finely chopped.
– ½ cup shredded carrots, optional
– 1 tsp sugar

Directions:

Cut the cucumbers in half width-wise and make a deep X shaped incision extending 2/3’s of the way down the inside of each cucumber.

  Place the cucumbers in a sieve set over a bowl, sprinkle the inside with the salt and allow to set for 30 minutes to drain. Stuff the chili flakes mixture into the cucumbers.  Make sure to place the mixture into all the crevices.  Do two passes: the first focusing on the horizontal segments and the second on the vertical.

kim-chi oi sobagi
Quick Cucumber Kim-chi

Place the cucumbers in a 2 quart-size containers and spoon the remaining filling on top.  Pour the reserved brine liquid into the containers, cover, and set aside at room temperature for 1 or 2 days.  After recommended time, taste the crunchiness and balance of flavors. It should be salty, sweet, and savory.
Serve the cucumbers when the crunchiness that you like. Keep any leftovers in the fridge. This is a quick ferment and keeps about 3 to 7 days. You can keep the reserve kimchi pickle juice to serve over rice noodles or use as a cold soup.

Enjoy!

For all your fermentation needs and culture starters see our web store – store.organic-cultures.com

Instant Apple, Pear, and Persimmon Kimchi (Traditional Winter Type)

pear kim-chi~ Sagyua, Gaam, Bae Kimchi ~ Instant Apple, Pear, and Persimmon Kimchi (Traditional Winter Type)

A trio of fresh seasonal fruits plays the roll of combining the sweet, savory, and spicy by using a combination of sweet autumnal fruits. Feel free to use what is regional to your area. Choose young, firm fruits and crisp, juicy pears are needed to impart bright flavors! Today, we will also build traditional flavors in the Korean style of using different commonly unused parts to complement the fruity-spices nicely. This kimchi may be use like an Indian chutney…great for meat style entrees. Fermentation: Ready to eat or allow to ferment a couple days. This is a quick ferment.

Asian Pear Kimchi
Ingredients Needed:
– 1 lb persimmons, peeled, cored, quartered, then cut into 1/8 inch thick slices
– ½ Asian or Bosc pear, again peeled, cored, quartered, and cut into 1/8 inch slices
– 1 medium apple, peeled, cored, and sliced.
– 12 stems flat-leaf parsley, cut into 1 ½ inch pieces.
– 1 tsp Korean chili pepper flakes
– ½ tsp chopped garlic ½ tsp anchovy sauce

Directions:
– In a small mixing bowl, combine the fruits and parsley steams.
– Add chili flakes, garlic, and anchovy sauce.
– Mix well until combined.
– Let stand for at least 15 minutes for flavors to combine.
– Serve immediately or refrigerate, covered and consume within a few days.

– End
Happy culturing! Live, grow, and share cultured foods.  See our online store for culturing/fermentation items, new culture starters, and more.

Kim Chi Recipe #1 – Mother In-law’s Kim Chi – Baechu Gutjori (Traditional)

kim chiMother In-law’s Kim-Chi Baechu Gutjori (Traditional)

Koreans celebrate the first fall Napa cabbage harvest with this style of Kim-chi.  It may be eaten right away or aged for a time. This style is enriched with both the land and sea with a base of beef stock and sea foods of oysters, salted shrimp, and anchovy sauce.
Ingredients Needed:
Brine…
– To medium heads of fresh Napa cabbage, about 4 to 5 pounds
– 2 tablespoons of sea salt
Sweet Rice Porridge…
To make the porridge add 1/3 cup powered sweet rice to enough water to form a thick paste.  Simmer this ‘porridge’ over heat to remove the raw flour taste.  Allow to cool before adding to the seasoning paste.
Seasoning Paste…
– 2 tbsp of salted shrimp
– 1/3 cup of sweet rice porridge
– ¼ cup anchovy sauce
– ¼ cup beef or vegetable stock
– 2 tbsp minced garlic
– 1 tbsp peeled and grated fresh ginger root
– 2 tsp sugar
– 2/3 cup Korean chili pepper flakes
– ½ cup thinly sliced yellow onion
– 4 green onions, green parts, about ½ cup
– 3 oz of chives
– 6 to 8 fresh oysters (optional)kim-chiDirections:

– Cut cabbage into quarters and then cut ¼ in half lengthwise. Remove cores. End by cutting pieces into 1 inches wide strips and 6 inches long.
– In a large bowl toss cabbage with the salt. Sit aside and allow to brine for at least an hour. Rinse off the salt by running under cold water and allow the cabbage to drain thoroughly.
– To make the seasoning paste… Grind the shrimp and mix in a bowl with the porridge, anchovy paste, stock, garlic, ginger, and sugar. Lastly add the ¼ cup of the chili pepper flakes. Blend well.
– In a large bowl, toss the cabbage, onion, green onions, and chives with the remaining chili flakes. Insure that all the cabbage is coated with the chilies. Add the seasoning paste and oysters and mix well.
– Pack tightly into a 2 quart container, cover, and set aside for 2 to 3 days at room temperature.
Then move to the refrigerator to slow/stop the fermentation. Since the ferment will expand make sure to allow at least a 5% head space to prevent overflow.This style of kim-chi may be eaten directly, allowed to ferment for a short time, or allowed to ferment for a longer amount of times. Enjoy and happy fermenting!

See our web store for many new products, culturing supplies, koji spores, and more:

Moroccan-Style Preserved Lemons

preserved lemons
Moroccan preserved lemons

These days one can buy preserved lemons, however, making them at home brings a rich, clean taste of homemade goodness.  Preserved lemons bring a multidimensional freshness and a wonderfully distinct pungency to the lemons.  Traditional served in Morocco in salads, soups, or even cocktails as they are alongside the grilled fish.  When eating them with grilled sardines only the rind is eaten.

The following recipe only has a few ingredients and only takes a bit of time to make.  You’ll be very pleased with the results!

Ingredients…

– 6 lemons, try to use Meyer style lemons if possible.
– 2/3 cup kosher sea salt
– 1 to 1 1/2 cups fresh lemon juice (use  5 to 6 extra lemons)
– 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
– 6-cup jar with a tight-fitting lid

preserved lemon
Directions…

1.  Wash lemons, then drain.  Some boil the lemons for 5 minutes, but this will kill the natural occurring bacteria and wild yeast.
2.  Cut each lemon into 8 wedges, discarding seeds.  Or the lemons may be left whole and the tops and bottoms deeply sliced 4 times.
3.  Toss lemons with kosher salt in a bowl, then pack lemons, along with their salt, tightly into jar.
4.  Add enough lemon juice to cover lemons.  Seal jar and let lemons stand at room temperature, shaking gently once a day, for 5 days.
5. Add oil to jar and refrigerate.  The oil will help to keep unwanted bacteria from turning the lemons bad.

entree with lemonsNote:
Preserved lemons can be chilled, covered in their juices, up to 1 year.
This is really a salt brine with wanted bacteria and wild yeast.
From the sea salt and correct bacteria the lemons will have a very pleasing taste.Enjoy and Happy Culturing!

 

Fermented Rice Wines – Asian Style Wine

Makgeolli Rice Wine
Drinking Makgeolli Korean Rice Wine

  Rice wine, also known as mijiu, is an alcoholic drink made from sticky rice, traditionally consumed in East and Southeast Asia, and also South Asia.  Rice wine is made from the fermentation of rice starch that has been converted to sugars, which in turn produces alcohol. Microbes are the source of the enzymes that convert
the starches to sugar.

  Rice wine typically has an alcohol content of 18%–25% ABV.
Rice wines are used in Asian gastronomy at formal dinners
and banquets, but many types are used in cooking.
They are also used in a religious and ceremonial context.

Best known rice wine types are Japanese mirin, mageolli a milky traditional wine from Korea, and of course Japanese sake.  Sake is the most widely known type of rice wine in North America because of its ubiquitous appearance in Japanese restaurants.

There are many other types of wines produced from rice with each country and area having it’s own style of wine.   Many types come from China and lesser known traditional styles are from Korea, Philippines, India, and smaller tribes from Asia.

We offer three types of rice wine starter kits.  Easy to make and enjoy for the holidays.  Most starters make 1L of wine and takes about a week to produce.  Happy Brewing!

Tape Rice Wine
Tape Rice Wine
~ Tape Rice Wine Starter for Homemade Rice Wine ~
Korean Rice Wine
Korean Traditional Rice Wine
~ Makgeolli – Korean Traditional Rice Wine Making Kit ~
Kuro Koji Black
Kuro Koji Black
~ Kuro Koji, Black Koji Kin Spores for Making Awamori Shochu ~

You can purchase any of the above starters at our web store Organic-Cultures.com
or
~ Culturing Spore Types – Many Japanese Koji Spores, Tempeh Starter Spores, Tape, Natto Starter, & Rice Wines ~

Happy Brewing !